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Keep an Eye Out for Conditions That Could Cause Secondary Glaucoma

What Is Glaucoma? By Mr Gok Ratnarajan

 

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. It is caused by high pressure inside the eye which leads to damage of the optic nerve that connects your eye to the visual centre in the brain.

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Why & How to Protect Your Eyes in The Sun

 

This week we have been lucky enough to have some beautiful sunny weather and it is set to stay for the weekend. While many people know that keeping their skin protected from the sun is important, we may forget about how important it is to protect our eyes too.

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These Risks Factors Affect the Severity of Fuch’s Corneal Dystrophy

Eye Specialist: Certain Risk Factors May Affect Fuch’s Corneal Dystrophy Severity

Fuch’s corneal dystrophy is a corneal disease that affects the endothelium or the innermost layer of the cornea. It is a non-inflammatory, sporadic or autosomal dominant dystrophy which causes the cornea to swell and the endothelial cells to die. The endothelium layer’s ability to pump water out of the cornea and help maintain corneal transparency is then severely affected, causing glare, halo and reduced visual acuity. This type of dystrophy also progresses rather slowly and can be found in both eyes.

 

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Eye Floaters Could Be a Sign of a More Severe, Underlying Condition

Floaters and When You Should Visit an Eye Clinic for Immediate Treatment

Eye floaters look like small specks, dots, circles, lines, strings or cobwebs in your field of vision. They may appear to be floating in front of your eyes, but floaters are actually tiny clumps of gel or cells floating inside the vitreous that fills your eye. Most of them are due to age-related changes that occur as the vitreous thickens, shrinks or becomes more liquid. What you are seeing are the shadows cast by these clumps on your retina, especially when you stare at a bright, plain surface, a reflective object or a blank paper.

 

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Ask a Doctor How to Best Manage Anisometropia After Cataracts Surgery

Tips for Patients Coping with Anisometropia After Their First Cataracts Surgery

While cataracts surgery can safely be performed at any stage of their development, doctors only operate on one eye at a time. This means that in between surgery, your eyes will be out of balance with each other until after the surgery with the second eye. This vision imbalance is referred to as anisometropia, which is derived from the Greek words that literally translate to “the measure of vision is not equal.” In medical terms, it is defined as a condition in which the two eyes have a different refractive power, so there is an equal focus between the two eyes.

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common eye injuries

Eye Sleep; What Is It?

 

Many people refer to the collection of mucus which builds up in the corner of the eyes overnight as ‘sleep’, but the medical term for it is call rheum.

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